Usta Socal Adult

Rankings & Ratings

Climb The Ranks

Rankings and Ratings play an integral role in our adult programs. Rankings track your competitive growth and help determine where you stand among your peers. Ratings are required for most competitive formats, designed to create a level playing field in each division and to produce high quality tennis each and every round. Many players also view rankings and ratings as a badge of honor, celebrating personal achievement in the game.

Rankings

Rankings always refer to tournament play. Updated rankings are published annually at the start of the calendar year, and reflect how players compare in a given division after a full year of competition.

Beginning in January 2021, all player rankings will be calculated nationally in a points-per-round ranking system as part of the USTA’s Adult Tournament Alignment. Points are distributed based on the event’s level assignment (L1-L7), draw format, and the round a player reaches in that draw.

National Standing Lists (NSL) are published monthly and calculate player standings based on a rolling 52-week period. NSLs may be used for seeding tournaments, among other factors. 

Both Year End Ranking Lists and National Standing lists can be filtered by Section and District.

For more information on the Adult Tournament Alignment, please review the resources below.

Ratings

The National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP) is a classification system that helps promote fair and competitive play by determining overall skill level. From the true beginner (1.0) to the pro ranks (7.0), ratings are based solely on skills, regardless of the player’s age.

Ratings are generated through NTRP play in both tournaments and leagues. Overall performance is tracked and fluctuates throughout the year as you play. These ratings, determined to a half-point (3.0, 3.5, 4.0…), are published at the end of the calendar year.

If you are new to the USTA or if you have been out of the game for a while, you will have to self-rate to join any USTA League or sanctioned tournament. The self-rate process takes you through a number of questions about your tennis background and assigns a “provisional” rating to get you started.

If you play enough tennis in qualified match play before the year’s end, you will generate a computer rating (see below). As a self-rated player, you are also subject to disqualification and grievance – so make sure you answer the self-rate questions honestly, and notify the Section office if you think you are playing out of level.

For a complete and detailed overview of the National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP), visit USTA.com’s NTRP Frequently Asked Questions by clicking the link below.

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The USTA tracks dynamic ratings for self-rated players to ensure players are playing at the correct level. Generally, these ratings are generated after each match you play, and are calculated to a hundredth of a point. Dynamic ratings, which are not published for public viewing, change based on the strength of your wins and losses in eligible matches throughout the year.

For a complete and detailed overview of the National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP visit USTA.com’s NTRP Frequently Asked Questions by clicking the button below.

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Also known as a “computer rating,” these ratings are published each December and are generated based on a player’s results in qualified League play and NTRP tournament play. There are different types of “computer” ratings based on the type of data you provide the system throughout the year.

For a complete and detailed overview of the National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP visit USTA.com’s NTRP Frequently Asked Questions by clicking the button below.

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There are three major types of rating appeals:

  1. Self-Rate Appeals
    Consider a self-rate appeal if you feel that your rating is not accurate following the self-rate process. You may appeal the rating up or down. If you appeal to a higher play level, the computer will grant it immediately. If you wish to appeal to a lower level, you will have to fill out a self-rate appeal form, which will be reviewed by a committee at the Section office.
  2. Automatic Appeals
    Automatic appeals are appeals of year-end computer ratings that are granted because the player’s rating is within the “appealable range.” Players can log into TennisLink and appeal their computer rating at any time.
  3. Medical Appeals
    The medical appeal process is reserved for players with permanently disabling injuries or medical conditions, and are reviewed at the National level.

For a complete and detailed overview of the National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP visit USTA.com’s NTRP Frequently Asked Questions by clicking the button below.

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